University of Michigan: Science News Round-Up

Here’s a round-up of stories involving new science research at the University of Michigan:

Gene linked to pancreatic cancer growth, U-M study finds

Inactivating Kras caused tumors to disappear, suggesting possible treatment target…click here to read more

Genes linked to cancer could be easier to detect with liquid lasers

Using a liquid laser, University of Michigan researchers have developed a better way to detect the slight genetic mutations that might predispose a person to a particular type of cancer or other diseases…click here to read more

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Michigan Scores a ‘C’ in Science Standards

The Fordham Institute published a report that grades all of the 50 states’ science standards.  Michigan was scored a ‘C’.

Now what is the Fordham Institute? Zen Faulkes over at Neurodojo wrote about this organization’s study and stated that it is a conservative think tank. This is likely to raise some eyebrows amongst skeptics, however Greg Laden commented to me in his blog post, also about the report, that this think tank seems to be on the up and up, and thus, has published a valid scientific assessment.

You can read the full 217 page write-up here and the 4-page report on Michigan here.

Other states’ scores:

  • Arkansas: B
  • California: A
  • Indiana: A-
  • Ohio: B
  • Oregon: F
  • Texas: C

You can find out how all the states were graded here.

I have to admit that it’s pretty disconcerting to see Indiana and Ohio get better grades than Michigan.  Even Illinois’s D and Wisconsin’s F didn’t make me feel any better.

University of Michigan: Science News Round-Up

Here’s a round-up of stories involving new science research at the University of Michigan:

Solar Storms: Expect one per month as solar maximum approaches

We can expect an average of one solar storm per month over the next few years, says University of Michigan professor Tamas Gombosi. Click here to read more….

Gaseous ring around young star raises questions

Astronomers have detected a mysterious ring of carbon monoxide gas around the young star V1052 Cen, which is about 700 light years away in the southern constellation Centaurus. Click here to read more….

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University of Michigan: Science News Round-Up

Here’s a round-up of stories involving new science research at the University of Michigan:

Michigan Solar Car Team places third in the world

With an average daily speed of 52 mph, the Michigan Solar Car Team braved a “smoldering brush fire” and “wind-shearing road trains” across the continent of Austrailia, and came in third place in the international competition.

“It was an incredibly close race, especially due to the unexpected elements such as the brush fire which delayed the race, dust storms, major cloud cover at the end of the race, and the ultra reliable cars of Nuon and Tokai,” said Chris Hilger, the team’s business director.

Click here to read the entire news story.

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University of Michigan: Science News Round-Up

Here’s a round-up of stories involving new science research at the University of Michigan:

Examining ice’s chilling effect on offshore wind power

Does lake ice have an impact on wind turbines?  Two University of Michigan studies funded by the Department of Energy will seek out the answer.  The results of which could help provide information on investing into this alternative energy solution.

The researchers’ work will concentrate on the Great Lakes, and are among $43 million dollars in DoE grants provided for 41 wind energy projects nationwide. The studies are launched to speed technical innovations, lower costs and shorten the timeline for deploying offshore wind energy systems.

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Telex: A New Tool To Combat Internet Censorship

On the Freedom to Tinker blog, University of Michigan assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science, J. Alex Halderman, unveils a new anti-censorship measure called Telex.

Telex is a new approach to circumventing Internet censorship that is intended to help citizens of repressive governments freely access online services and information. The main idea behind Telex is to place anticensorship technology into the Internet’s core network infrastructure, through cooperation from large ISPs. Telex is markedly different from past anticensorship systems, making it easy to distribute and very difficult to detect and block.

You can read more about this new innovation on the Telex website.

I also spoke with one of the developers on the project, U-M grad student, Eric Wustrow, in this short 8-minute interview: