“Scientists Fair 2014″ (Saturday, May 31st)

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On Saturday May 31st, the Ann Arbor Science & Skeptics are hosting the third annual “Scientists Fair,” a science fair where the exhibits are actual scientists.  The event will take place from 1:00pm to 3:00pm. This will be free and open to both Ann Arbor Science & Skeptics members and the public.

Located in the Multi-Purpose room (in the lower level of the main branch), there will be several professors and researchers from the University of Michigan with expertise in general fields of knowledge, available to answer your questions. Some of the topics will include: Astrochemistry, Geology & Earth Science, Exploring Mars, Climate Science, Medical Research, Nuclear Power, and more

You can watch a short video about the Scientists Fair here (video)

The purpose of this event is two-fold:

  1. For our members and the public to not only acquaint people to scientific knowledge, but also to how that knowledge is obtained.
  2. For the scientists and professors to talk about their research with you, and to share with you their excitement and passion.

There is no reservation limit for this meet-up. And we are encouraging you to invite as many of your family and friends who enjoy science. This year the library is sponsoring our event, and we’d really like to get a big turnout.

NanoDays at Ann Arbor Hands on Museusm (March 29-30)

Ann Arbor Hands on MuseumLooking for a family-friendly introduction to nanotechnology to prepare for our upcoming Meet-Up discussing Innovation in Manufacturing & Engineering? This Saturday and Sunday March 29th and 30th the Ann Arbor Hands on Museum, in partnership with the Nanoscale Informal Science Education Network, will be hosting NanoDays from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm each day.

From the website:

“NanoDays is a nationwide festival of educational programs about nanoscale science and engineering and its potential impact on the future. NanoDays events are organized by participants in the Nanoscale Informal Science Education Network and take place at over 200 science museums, research centers, and universities across the country … NanoDays engages people of all ages in learning about this emerging field of science, which holds the promise of developing revolutionary materials and technologies.”

Activities include exploration of capillary action, non-Newtonian fluids, new nano products and materials and invisibility cloaks.

Science Café: The Politics of Preserving the Past

UM-MuseumWednesday, March 26
5:30-7:30 pm
Conor O’Neill’s Traditional Irish Pub
318 S. Main St., Ann Arbor
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Preserving historic sites is often not simple, but involves compromises for contemporary businesses and residences. Sometimes scholarly work to preserve the past has unfortunate, and occasionally unforeseen tragic consequeces for contemporary communities. We will examine several examples, from India and from right here in Ann Arbor, as we discuss the politics of preservation.
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Speakers include Carla Sinopoli, Curator of Asian Archaeology and Director of the U-M Museum Studies Program and Susan Wineberg, local author and Ann Arbor historian. Join us for an engaging conversation on the political consequences of scholarship, advocacy, and preservation.
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Offered as a part of the College of Literature,Science, and the Arts’ Winter 2014 Theme semester: India in the World.
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Science Cafés provide an opportunity for audiences to discuss current science topics with experts in an informal setting. All Science Cafés take place at Conor O’Neill’s Traditional Irish Pub, 318 South Main Street, Ann Arbor. Hors d’oeuvres at 5:30 pm; program 6-7:30 pm.

UM Astronomy Public Lecture: “Lighting up the Universe: Witnessing Cosmic Dawn” (Feb 21st ~7pm)

martha haynesFriday, February 21, 2013 at 7:00pm
Dennison Building, Room 182
500 Church St
Ann Arbor

Thirteen and a half billion years ago, four hundred thousand years after the Big Bang, the universe had expanded and cooled enough for hydrogen atoms to form. All was darkness. It took another few hundred million years before stars and galaxies lit up the universe, ending the cosmic “dark age.”

Professor Haynes will talk about what we know about the first stars, galaxies, and supermassive black holes. She will also show how new and future telescopes will enable us to witness the epoch of “cosmic dawn.”

Visit http://www.lsa.umich.edu/astro for more information or download the poster (PDF). This event is free and open to the public.

Martha Haynes is the Goldwin Smith Professor of Astronomy at Cornell University. Her research interests include galaxy formation, cosmology, and radio astronomy. She is the vice-president of the International Astronomical Union, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the National Academy of Sciences.

main-campus3map courtesy of Lowbrow Astronomers

Snake Vs. Dinosaur: A Public Exhibit

On Sunday, February 16th, the University of Michigan Museum of Natural History will be opening up its new exhibit “Snake vs. Dinosaur: Caught in the Act” featuring a depiction of a large prehistoric snake caught in the act of preying on a baby dinosaur hatchling.  A touchable cast of the fossil slab will reveal the evidence that scientists studied to interpret the event.  The snake’s skull and vertebrae are visible, along with two spherical unhatched eggs.

This exhibit is part of an overall theme about Predators.  Throughout the month of February, there will be Hands-On Demonstrations featuring Owls: Birds of Prey.  Hands-On Demonstrations are on Saturdays at 11 am and 3 pm; Sundays at 3 pm.  And on March 22, the museum will have a special Discovery Day devoted to Predators and Prey.

Saturday Morning Physics Winter 2014 Schedule

Beginning on Saturday, February 8th, the University of Michigan Physics department will begin hosting their weekly Saturday Morning Physics lectures.  The lectures will be held Saturday mornings, 10:30-11:30 AM in 170 Dennison on central campus. These events are free and refreshments will be served from 10:00 to 10:30 AM prior to the lecture.

Designed for general audiences, the lectures are an opportunity to hear physicists discuss their work in easy-to-understand, non-technical terms. The multimedia presentations include hands-on demonstrations of the principles discussed, along with slides, video, and computer simulations.

You can find out more information by clicking here, including parking suggestions and guidelines (scroll to the bottom).

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