Meet-Up (10/25) – The Impact of Information

* New Location *

eytan-adarThe Ann Arbor Science & Skeptics are having a meet-up on Saturday, October 25th from 4:00 to 7:00pm at the Classic Cup Cafe. Our special guest will be Dr. Eytan Adar, Associate Professor of Information and Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, at the College of Engineering at the University of Michigan.

This will be a little different from past meet-ups, but I think it will be a fun topic to learn more about … especially those of us who use the internet a lot.

Dr. Adar’s research is on temporal-informatics which is the study of the change of information—and our consumption of it—over time.   He has had numerous papers published ranging from a variety of topics such as benevolent deception in human-computer interaction, a better way of organizing your internet feeds, the dynamics of web content, and more.

The conversation for this meetup will likely touch on many different topics, but it will have the common theme of how information on the internet is affecting us all.

The first part of the event will be for general socializing and ordering refreshments. After which, there will be some announcements, and then we’ll start the informal Q & A at approximately 4:30pm.

There is no cost to attend but donations to cover the guest speaker’s meal and beverages, as well as general group expenses are appreciated.  ClassicCupThumbnail

 

If interested in attending, please RSVP here or on our Meeup page.

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Have some time to kill before the meet-up? Check out the Great Lakes Zoological Society’s “A World of Discovery” located just down the road from our get-together venue.   Admission is just $8 (children 3-11 $5.50).  And there is a $1 off coupon located on our website.

Great Lakes Zoological Society

Saturday Morning Physics Fall 2014 Schedule

Beginning on Saturday, October 11th, the University of Michigan Physics department will begin hosting their weekly Saturday Morning Physics lectures.  The lectures will be held Saturday mornings, 10:30-11:30 AM in 170 Dennison on central campus. These events are free and refreshments will be served from 10:00 to 10:30 AM prior to the lecture.

Designed for general audiences, the lectures are an opportunity to hear physicists discuss their work in easy-to-understand, non-technical terms. The multimedia presentations include hands-on demonstrations of the principles discussed, along with slides, video, and computer simulations.

You can find out more information by clicking here, including parking suggestions and seminar guidelines.

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Passenger Pigeon Centenary Exhibit at the Museum

pigeonSeptember 1 marked a somber anniversary:  the centenary of the death of the very last passenger pigeon, a bird named Martha, in the Cincinnati Zoo.

You can learn more by visiting the U-M Museum of Natural History’s exhibit about the passenger pigeon, A Shadow Over the Earth: The Life and Death of the Passenger Pigeon. The display panels for this exhibit have been made available online to other museums through the Project Passenger Pigeon website. To date, 35 museums are displaying UMMNH’s panels! The UMMNH exhibit includes a companion display, The Passenger Pigeon in Michigan, describing the key role our state played in the history of the pigeon.

On Sunday, September 14 from noon to 5 pm, take part in Flight of the Passenger Pigeon an afternoon of special programming including a screening of From Billions to None, a new documentary created for the centenary.

On Friday, September 19, join us at 7:30 pm for the Museum’s annual Farrand Memorial Lecture: Hope is the Thing with Feathers: Americans and Three Birds, by author and film producer Joel Greenberg.

Check out 100 Years Without the Passenger Pigeon, an article in LSA Today by Elizabeth Wason, inspired by the Museum’s exhibit.

And be sure to take advantage of the opportunity to see the Passenger Pigeon page of the double-elephant folio edition of John James Audubon’s The Birds of America (1827-1838), on display in the Audubon Room in U-M’s Hatcher Graduate Library Gallery.

(09/12/14) – RELATE Presents “Science By The Pint”

Science by the PintIf you missed the previous events, you have time to attend this last one for 2014!  The RELATE group (Researchers Expanding Lay-Audience Teaching and Engagement) is hosting their final “Science by the Pint” at the Tap Room of the Arbor Brewing Company (114 E Washington St, Ann Arbor, MI 48104) on Friday, September 12th, from 7 to 10pm.

Listen to student scientists as they provide short presentations on topics of which they are studying.

For more information about Friday’s event, you can visit Science By The Pint.  And to find out more about RELATE, you can visit their website, like them on Facebook, and follow them on Twitter (@RELATEatUM).

(09/06/14) – RELATE Presents “Science By The Pint”

Science by the PintA local group of faculty and graduate students at the University of Michigan called RELATE (Researchers Expanding Lay-Audience Teaching and Engagement) is hosting an event called “Science by the Pint” at the Tap Room of the Arbor Brewing Company (114 E Washington St, Ann Arbor, MI 48104).

On Saturday, September 6th, from 7-10pm, student scientists will give 15 to 20 minute talks on a variety of topics involving human physiology and health.

For more information about Saturday’s event, you can visit Science By The Pint.  And to find out more about RELATE, you can visit their website, like them on Facebook, and follow them on Twitter (@RELATEatUM).

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Camelopardalis – Meteor Shower on May 24th

Camelopardalis

Courtesy of the University of Michigan Museum of Natural History

“In the early morning hours of May 24, we have an opportunity to observe a brand new meteor shower, the “Camelopardalids,” named after the constellation (Camelopardalis) they will radiate from. The origin of the meteoritic debris is a comet called 209P. It has been around for a while, shedding debris as it goes, and this debris has been stacking up in the inner solar system for a long time.

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Between about 1:40 AM and 4:50 AM Eastern Daylight Time on the morning of May 24, the Earth will pass through some of this debris. Forecasts range from 1000 “shooting stars” per hour to 100 per hour. Here in North America, we will be in a pretty good place to observe them. The downside has to do with where the radiant is located.

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The radiant is about one third of the distance between the North Star and the nose of Ursa Major, the Great Bear. During the prime event time, this point will be fairly low on the northern horizon, meaning that tall trees and close-by houses could block your view. It may be necessary to find a location with a clear horizon in the north.

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Of interest with this shower is that the objects are moving relatively slowly, about 40,000 miles per hour, or about half as fast as many “shooting stars.” While fast by our standards, it means a better chance to spot and follow one as it streaks across the sky.

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A new meteor shower is rare and worth the effort to observe. The peak duration is short, and it isn’t sub-zero outside! There are a number of websites with information and history related to this event, but be sure to convert the Universal Time to Eastern Daylight Time. Subtract four hours.”

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For more information you can visit these websites.

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http://www.space.com/25768-new-meteor-shower-comet-linear.html

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http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2014/06may_newshower/